Just-in-Time Shipping: The Path to Container Efficiency

Just-in-Time Shipping: The Path to Container Efficiency

The 1970s played a pivotal role in the history of trade, shipping, and manufacturing. In this decade, Toyota revolutionized the manufacturing world with the wide adoption of its Just-in-Time (JIT) production planning process. In essence, that represents operating with low inventory levels where raw materials, goods, or even labor are scheduled to arrive or be replenished exactly when, or shortly before, they are needed in production. Having the system, Toyota could solve some of the problems associated with keeping high-inventory levels, free up a significant amount of capital, and reduce the opportunity costs. It could also minimize storage, service/maintenance, and inventory risk costs.

Nowadays, JIT and its equivalents are the industry standards in the automotive and are also universally adopted in the wider manufacturing and service verticals. However, if automotive or manufacturing sectors can afford to wait for an order to be placed and then produce, in many other business areas, in order to adopt JIT, highly accurate Demand Forecasting must be in place.

An obvious example of such an area is the container shipping industry, which in the 1970s has also experienced a renaissance with the wide adoption of containerization. However, improvident internal processes and trade imbalances led to huge inefficiencies. Empty containers had to be repositioned from big consumer centers such as Europe and the US to big manufacturing powerhouses like China and Southeast Asia. To be able to satisfy demand at any given time and location, and compensate for the long repositioning cycles, ocean shipping carriers keep excess container inventory. Traditionally, inland empty containers account for around 30-40% of the total container shipping fleet.

Safety & Efficiency: The Future Of Wearables In Logistics

Safety & Efficiency: The Future Of Wearables In Logistics

The logistics industry is no stranger to technological change. Few warehouses would consider using a hand-written ledger or other analog methods in 2020 when standalone digital kiosks and tablets have become the norm. These digital improvements have allowed for greater speed and efficiency, yet there are still gaps to be filled when it comes to logistics technology.

Seconds matter in logistics, where even a short delay in activity can cause issues further along the delivery chain. What’s more, the need for accuracy in identifying, handling, and processing packages is of keen importance. On average, businesses across the globe experience an average shrinkage rate of about 1.44%; given that the worldwide logistics industry is worth approximately 5.5 trillion euros, these losses and inefficiencies add up to billions missing from company balance sheets.

Major firms have begun the search for solutions to these issues. There’s a great deal of promise in wearables –  technology that, as the name implies, you can wear on your body and use to improve the logistics processes. Much of this technology is available here and now, while some remains just over the horizon. In any case, these devices could define the future of logistics tech and are already seeing increased adoption in companies seeking the next competitive edge.

Logistics Startup of the Month: Skyspace Cargo

skyspace

Every month we select one logistics startup which represents a positive example of innovation in Logistics and Supply Chain and has the potential to alter the way the industry operates. This month, Transmetrics selected Skyspace Cargo, the world’s leading air cargo booking platform, as the “Logistics Startup of the Month” for its remarkable contribution to air cargo innovation.

In order to learn more about the company and what makes Skyspace unique, we have talked with Toby Raworth, CEO at Skyspace Cargo, about the startup’s journey and what’s ahead for the air cargo sector.

How 5G Networks Will Create a New Era of Connected Logistics

How 5G Networks Will Create a New Era of Connected Logistics

Since its introduction, 5G has quickly become the hot topic of every industry, and for good reason. By 2025, 5G networks are expected to cover one-third of the world’s population, and a 5G economy study found that by 2035, 5G could potentially enable up to $13.2 trillion worth of goods and services and create up to 22 million new jobs.

But what exactly is 5G, and why is it going to make such a difference in the way the world works? You might remember that with 3G, or the third generation of cellular technology, mobile data has been pushed forward, and 4G brought in a new era of mobile broadband. Now, 5G — the fifth mobile generation — will usher in the highest mobile connection speeds and lowest latency rates ever recorded. The new levels of connectivity created by 5G have the potential to impact nearly every industry, making fully-remote healthcare, smart cities, digitized logistics, and more into a way of life.

Logistics Startup of the Month: Cloudleaf

Logistics Startup of the Month: Cloudleaf

Every month we select one logistics startup which represents a positive example of innovation in Logistics and Supply Chain and has the potential to alter the way the industry operates. This month, Transmetrics selected Cloudleaf, a digital visibility provider, as the “Logistics Startup of the Month” for its outstanding contribution to the supply chain virtualization.

In order to learn more about the company and what makes Cloudleaf unique, we have talked with Lisa Magnuson, CMO at Cloudleaf, about the startup’s journey and how digital twins can transform the supply chain.

FedEx Surround – It Is All About Microsoft vs. Amazon but the Winner Is…. Logistics

FedEx Surround

In May 2020, the CEOs of FedEx and Microsoft announced a partnership aiming to “revolutionize commerce”, “transform logistics”, etc. The aim of this initiative seems to be not only to enhance the capabilities of both parties but also to rival a common enemy. Dimitar Pavlov, Head of Business Development at Transmetrics, discusses the implications of the partnership as well as the hidden potential for the logistics industry.